Category: Blog


What’s the Best Wood to Choose for the Outdoors?

By Perswood Team,

Find out which wood types superbly endure all weather conditions.  

 

When it comes to designing an outdoor deck, you’d want something that can last through the years, no matter how well-trod or battered by the elements. Planks popping upwards are unsightly; the last thing you’d want to see when sunbathing by the pool, tending to your garden or strolling along the promenade of your development.

Fortunately choosing the appropriate wood type for your flooring can help you ensure that it stays in good condition rain or shine.

Such wood is usually more dense and less porous, and hence will not absorb water as easily as those with lower densities. Such properties also allow them to be more durable overall. They would typically qualify for a rating of 3 and above based on the European standards for durability (indicating they are moderately to very durable).

Examples of wood that have these characteristics include ipe, yellow balau, chengal and teak.

Another thing to look out for to help wood flooring outdoors last, would be the installation method. Installing the planks through nailing them down punctures the wood. This can result in their surfaces collecting more water, drying slower and eventually rotting.

In contrast, we usually secure wood planks used outdoors along their sides through a side clip fastening system. This allows the planks to be installed without puncturing the surface of the wood.

The dimensions of the wood planks can also affect their susceptibility to expansion and contraction when exposed to the elements. Every wood has varying degrees of “stability” in terms of how much it expands and contracts; generally, more dimensionally stable woods, such as chengal or teak, can afford to have a wider range of widths without affecting the thickness of the planks. Less stable types of wood will need to be thicker, have wider widths and shorter lengths.

 

Zircon for assorted outdoor elements

An exceptionally suitable wood for the outdoors is Zircon wood, which is wood that has been subjected to thermal treatment of around 190 to 250 degrees Celsius. This fundamentally transforms the properties of the wood, upping its stability and durability, and provides a much wider range of wood choices for the outdoors.

It also unlocks more variety in dimensions for the wood; you’d be able to opt for thinner and longer planks than usual. As such, this flexibility usually makes the wood suitable for other outdoor elements as well, such as ceilings, claddings and screens.

Having an outdoor deck that weathers well through the years is within reach, as long as you select wood that is suitably durable and keep it maintained.

Find out more about our Zircon wood offerings and how they can be incorporated for your outdoor plans.

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Flooring System Gives Lift to Wisma Geylang Serai Dance Studios

By Perswood Team,

Photo Source: People’s Association

Flooring designed to support dancers’ movements takes centre stage.

 

The pointed double-pitched rooftops and striking elevated profile of Wisma Geylang Serai stand out yet harmoniously meld with its buzzy surrounding neighbourhood. This should be no surprise considering that its design draws inspiration from traditional Malay kampong houses that used to characterise the locale, and which still see their heritage etched into the area today.

 

Adjoining the historical Geylang Serai Market, Wisma Geylang Serai may have its design steeped in heritage, but is itself a recent addition to the area. Opened in 2018, the community and cultural centre holds services, modern amenities and top-of-the-line facilities that are available for the public’s use.

 

One such example is the dance studios located at the second storey of Wisma Geylang Serai.

 

When the dance studios were being planned for, the objective was for them to be able to support numerous styles of dance, ranging from cultural and classical dances, such as ballet, to more contemporary forms like K-Pop.

 

They were also to be suitable for all kinds of users, from beginners to experienced dancers, as the studios would be used for classes of varying levels.

 

In order to meet these requirements, we installed a pneumatic airoflor flooring system. Such systems include everything needed for the floor to be installed and function to its intended effect. In this case, the flooring system comprises multiple layers, which include rubber padding, thick foam, and several layers of plywood. Oak planks make up the topmost layer.

This is the most sophisticated version of this type of flooring system, which is usually recommended for sports and dance venues. The floor is designed to provide cushioning for movement – reducing impact and minimising injuries – allowing dancers to spin, leap and land safely. The thick flooring also keeps sound transmission to a minimum.

 

The American White Oak that tops off the flooring layers has a beautiful pale natural colour, which lends itself to marking and blocking during dance routines. The wood’s hardiness and anti-slip finishing further bolsters it as a dream to dance on. The high quality oak was prepared in the USA; not only was it selected for its fine grain, it was also processed to be long-lasting and to fit together seamlessly for the dance studio floor.

 

Find out more about Perswood’s flooring systems, each designed with a particular need in mind, to see which is most suited for your project.

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Soothing Oak Hues Complement Laidback and Elegant Home

By Perswood Team,

Oak flooring in neutral yet varied shades provides the perfect base for a property inspired by the south of California and France.

When seeking a space to call home, our client – a family which enjoys travelling – desired a place they could enjoy together and entertain guests in. They also wanted to showcase their art collection.

 

Their home blends design sensibilities from Southern California and Southern France, making for a relaxed and intimate, yet elegant and spacious two-storey dwelling. The living area extends out to a garden and swimming pool surrounded by trees. Their architects specially designed the home to look out to the lush views through French windows, which also bring natural light into the interior living space.

To complement the light and graceful décor, oak was selected as the flooring throughout the house, and for the spiral staircase connecting the first and second floors. As a porous wood, oak easily takes on other colours. This allowed for it to be stained in varying tan hues that introduce a rustic yet refined quality, and highlight the wood’s natural grain. Its neutral palette also underscores the beauty and uniqueness of the family’s collection.

Engineered wood was used for the flooring as it could be prepared in broader panels than solid wood, matching the expansive feel of the interconnected living spaces.

Meanwhile, the spiral staircase curves organically between the home’s two floors, with the oak steps smoothly continuing the aesthetic from one to the other.

 

Another factor behind why the homeowners opted for wood flooring throughout the house, was its feel underfoot. They liked its pleasant warmth, especially after waking up.

 

Find out more about the differences between engineered wood, wood and vinyl and which is the most suitable for you in this article, or explore our range of engineered wood and wood products.

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What’s the Difference Between Wood, Engineered Wood and Vinyl?

By Perswood Team,

We break down the pros and cons of the three.

 

If you’re currently shopping around for flooring material, you might be mystified by the wood or wood-like products on the market. In particular, it can be tricky to distinguish between wood, engineered wood and vinyl. What are the differences between these, and which should you pick for your home or development? We’ll highlight what each product is known for, and when you might want to use each one.

 

Composition

One big difference among the three products is what they’re made of. Wood and engineered wood are natural products, composed entirely of wood. However, the former consists of only one type of wood, while the latter usually is made up of two types of wood – a top layer of a minimum 3mm thickness, supported by layers of plywood beneath.

On the other hand, vinyl flooring is made of synthetic material – polyvinyl chloride (PVC) – with colours and patterns (including those resembling wood grains) printed onto its topmost layer.

 

Feel/texture

The flooring material determines how the floor will feel beneath your feet. Organic materials such as wood and engineered wood bring a feeling of warmth when you tread on them. You also have the option of introducing different textures to the topmost layer of engineered wood, such as distressed or wire-brushed, for a grippier or more fascinating experience for your bare feet.

Vinyl flooring, as a synthetic compound, will feel more plasticky underfoot and will not bring the same kind of warmth and cosy comfort as wood.

 

Maintenance

When it comes to maintenance or cleaning, a key difference is the need to avoid the use of an overly damp mop for wood or engineered wood floors. Otherwise, cleaning is fuss-free for all three surfaces, which benefit from regular vacuuming and mopping.

Because vinyl has a homogenous composition, it’s also less prone to scratches than wood surfaces. Nonetheless, a benefit of wood and engineered wood is that their top layers can always be restored through re-grinding and re-sanding.

 

Price

Generally, wood and engineered wood cost more than vinyl tiles due to the time, labour and craftsmanship that go into sourcing the wood and preparing it. This is as opposed to vinyl, which is manufactured. Owners of homes or developments can also potentially lay vinyl tiles themselves to save on costs, while wood and engineered wood require specialised knowledge and expertise for installation.

 

Customisability

Among the three, the least customisable is wood; those who prefer it usually select from among different wood types for a specific natural colour and grain. Engineered wood, while composed of wood, allows for different colours and textures for its top layer, which are introduced when the wood is processed.

A wider range of dimensions for each engineered wood plank is also possible as compared to wood. Engineered wood’s composition, with layers of plywood beneath, results in greater stability no matter what size the planks are cut to.

As vinyl is a matter of printing the desired image onto the top layer, its customisability will depend on the product range that you go for – some offer more varied patterns and colours than others.

 

Environmental friendliness

A bonus of using wood and engineered wood is that their natural composition guarantees they won’t bring in any toxic chemicals or compounds. Depending on the materials used in its production, vinyl can give off fumes with varying levels of toxicity, so it’s best to check what the manufacturing process is like.

As a form of plastic, vinyl will also take much longer to decompose upon disposal than wood or engineered wood.

However, if you’re opting for wood or engineered wood, check that they’re harvested sustainably from well-managed forests. For example, we source wood from suppliers who are certified by the likes of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) or the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC).

Keen to find out more about which flooring material is right for you? Check out our range of wood and engineered wood or click on the chat button to get in touch.

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Why Top Tier Hotels Are Choosing Engineered Wood Floors Over Solid Wood

By Perswood Team,

Goodwood Park Hotel and the Ritz Carlton are among the hotels that have opted for engineered wood.

 

Engineered wood is fast becoming the flooring of choice for many hotels. In Singapore, several premium hotels have chosen engineered wood as flooring for their guest rooms and function halls. For example, we worked with Ritz Carlton, One Farrer Hotel and Spa, and Goodwood Park Hotel – hospitality properties focused on luxury, wellness and heritage respectively – to provide engineered wood flooring that met their needs.

We break down the rationale behind hotels favouring engineered wood.

 

Highly sustainable

One reason why hotels opt for engineered wood is because of its sustainability. Engineered wood maximises the harvested timber, as it only forms the topmost 4mm to 6mm layer of the engineered wood planks. This means that less timber is required as compared to solid wood, which has a thickness of around 15mm to 20mm.

Using engineered wood can hence help hotels to fulfil the criteria for attaining the Building and Construction Authority’s Green Mark certification. The scheme evaluates each building’s environmental impact and performance.

Sustainability was a priority for all three hotels, informing their choice of flooring. They have since received the certification; One Farrer Hotel and Spa was conferred with the Platinum certification, which is the highest possible tier of recognition.

 

Plentiful options for customisation

Another reason for engineered wood’s popularity is its ease of customisation. As it is processed in a factory, a wide range of colours and textures can be introduced to produce unique and attractive looks. For instance, wire-brushed, distressed and sawn-cut textures differentiate wood surfaces from the usual smooth finishes and can enhance the aesthetic and experience of the floor.

While all three hotels selected white oak, each customised the flooring to vastly different effects:

One Farrer Hotel and Spa opted for its flooring to have an aged rustic appearance, and chose two shades for its suites – one a rich chocolate brown, the other a lighter hue – which were achieved through oiled finishes.

Goodwood Park Hotel selected a light tan, and a smoked oak aesthetic. The panels were installed in a herringbone pattern.

The Ritz Carlton meanwhile opted for rift and quarter oak, which beautifully displays the timber’s vertical grain, in a natural shade for its function hall.

 

In addition, engineered wood flooring offers more flexibility when it comes to plank dimensions. Engineered wood is better able to maintain its dimensional stability compared to solid wood, and can afford wider widths without having to increase the thickness of its planks.

 

Robust stability of engineered wood planks

Engineered wood is manufactured such that multiple layers of plywood (our products utilise the highest quality birch) support the topmost layer of solid wood. This composition allows for each plank to be more stable as compared to solid wood, meaning that it will react less to changes in the temperature and environment.

Whether your room is hot or cold, there will be minimal chances of engineered wood expanding and contracting, and leaving gaps in the flooring.

 

Hardier coating due to UV curing

Around seven layers of protective coating are typically applied to engineered wood in the factory, and each one is cured with ultraviolet rays. This results in longer lasting durability for the coating, and hence a decreased susceptibility to scuffs, stains and damage for the wood flooring. This is especially useful for hotels and other commercial properties which see high foot traffic.

In contrast, solid wood usually has around three layers of protective coating, which is applied by hand onsite and left to dry.

 

No downtime required

As all sanding and coating of engineered wood is done in the factory, no further processing is needed after installation. Whereas for solid wood, a minimum of 14 days is required to allow the wood to acclimatise at the site after installation, following which sanding and coating is carried out.

 

Conclusion

Engineered wood provides multiple benefits for hotels and commercial buildings with its customisability, durable coating, stable structure and sustainability. The lack of downtime post-installation is another bonus.

Engineered wood can also be a suitable option for homeowners who prefer a unique look or particular dimensions for their wood panels.

Intrigued? Find out more about our engineered wood products or contact us with any questions using the website’s chat button.

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How to Keep Wood Floors in Shape When You’re Away

By Perswood Team,

Ensure your wood flooring stays in good condition even when no one’s around to maintain it.

If you own an overseas property, you might have had a rude shock at the rundown state of the floor upon returning after a long absence due to Covid-19. Developers with an intervening period between building a property and selling it also often face the challenge of making sure the floor stays in mint condition.

Generally, if you’re going to be away, or if your property’s going to be untenanted, for six months or longer, your wood flooring could decline in condition without regular care. However, this can be avoided by taking a few simple and straightforward measures.

Here’s what to do if your wood floor is going to be left untended for an extended length of time:

Guard against water leaks

Go around and make sure that the windows are closed, to prevent water from wetting your wood floor when it rains. Becoming excessively wet can cause your wood floor to soak in the water and swell up.

 

Remove any rubber-backed rugs

Store away any rugs or mats with rubber backings, such as anti-slip ones usually placed in front of bathrooms. These tend to trap moisture under them in conditions of high humidity, which can damage the floor. The rubber may also break down over time and stick to the floor.

 

Ventilate the property

Keep the property as well-ventilated as possible to allow heat and moisture to disperse. Timber is an organic material, so humid conditions can cause mould to grow on wood floors. Also, if the wood gets too hot, it could dry up and result in gaps in the wood.

To ensure ventilation when you’re away, keep the bathroom and bedroom doors open to allow cross-ventilation within your home. You can also keep bathroom windows ajar.

Close your curtains or lower your blinds to protect against heat and keep your apartment as cool as possible. If your air conditioner has an automated function, have it turn on for one hour a week to further cool the place down and dry out the air.

 

Maintenance upon returning

When you return or when your property is about to be rented out, you can easily clean and freshen up the floor. Vacuum up the dust, and use a well-wrung mop to apply water or a floor cleaner – be sure to use one designed for wood floors, such as the Bona Cleaner. Other detergents can dull the surface of your floor. For example, products meant for polishing and cleaning metal and stone could damage the coating of the floor.

If you come back to find that mould has grown, or the wood has warped, call in a specialist to resand, recoat and/or replace the wood as needed. The advantage of having wood as a floor material is that it can always be repaired and restored.

 

Conclusion

Leaving your wood flooring alone in an empty property isn’t a problem if you plan ahead. Just follow the steps above to prime your wood flooring for a long period of no maintenance.

For other times when you’re able to carry out regular floorcare, check out how to best clean your wood floor in this article.

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Warm Hues of American Walnut Create Welcoming Family Home

By Perswood Team,

A vibrant yet classy palette of wood flooring brings together this home for three generations.

 

When designing a four-storey home for his family within the Da Silva Lane neighbourhood, the owner was struck by the warm, multi-toned American Walnut wood flooring that he had seen at one of Perswood’s projects.

He had been searching for something unique and different from the teak commonly used in houses in Singapore. The multi-toned American Walnut melds a gradient of tan shades in a bright yet warm palette. Its interplay of colours is made even more fascinating by the rippling grain patterns.

Light cream streaks from the wood’s sap also line some of the panels, creating a “highlighting” effect that further draws out the vibrancy of the wood. Altogether, the timber provides a cheery yet soothing base to ground a home meant to embrace three generations, including our client’s children and his mother.

Our client also selected the wood for its classy and premium appearance, which complemented the terrace house’s modern and refined décor. The chic panelling was appropriate for his home office and public entertaining areas, besides the more personal quarters.

Seamless connection throughout

We installed American Walnut flooring for the bedrooms, hallways, home office, recreation room and staircase. The timber elegantly connects the various levels of the home, imbuing it with an inviting atmosphere.

The homeowner also installed lighting that lines each step of the staircase. The result: glowing honeyed grain that transforms an otherwise purely functional staircase, into a feature that can be admired from day to night.

Distinguished decking

A deck of Ipe Walnut was constructed at the entrance to the home. One of the hardiest woods available for outdoor use, the darker toned Ipe Walnut provides a handsome area to receive visitors. The deck also doubles up to conceal the owner’s water pump system for the koi pond nearby.

Should you want to find out more about our walnut series, including American Walnut and Ipe, view our specialty wood or contact us through our website’s chat button.

 

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How to Maintain Your Outdoor Deck

By Perswood Team,

Come rain or shine, keep your deck in peak condition through these easy-to-follow tips.

Outdoor decking is vital in creating lovely and accessible environments. Think sun-drenched platforms next to swimming pools, elegant yet cosy balconies, boardwalks and walkways that whisk you through landscaped areas. All these are examples of external wooden flooring that enhance their surroundings, and guarantee that it’s a pleasure to walk at and use the areas.

Outdoor decking sets itself apart from wood used for the indoors with its ability to weather the elements. Though hardy, outdoor flooring comes with its own vulnerabilities and still requires appropriate maintenance. We’ll take you through the common problems, how to rectify them, and the best way to care for your decking.

 

Common issues of outdoor decks

You might encounter some of these scenarios if you’ve got wood flooring outdoors:

  • Mouldy deck surface: caused by consistently wet surface or sub-floor, which create conducive environments for mould to thrive
  • Deck end wet rot: where you’ll see the ends of the wood planks rotting. As wood draws in moisture from its ends (just like a straw), these tend to rot if they do not dry out sufficiently.
  • Exposed nail or screw head: when subject to the sun and rain and hence different temperatures, the wood expands and contracts, causing nails and screws to dislodge
  • Minor surface checks: these are small hairline cracks that are also caused by the expansion and contraction of the wood
  • Colour fading or coating wearing off: due to exposure to the sun’s Ultraviolet (UV) rays and wear and tear

The main causes of these issues can be narrowed down to a few usual suspects. Firstly, mould and rot set in when the wood is not allowed to dry off and water does not exit quickly enough through the water outlets below the deck.

If you notice these signs, check if debris or dried leaves are clogging up the drainage system. In some cases, moisture-seeking roots could even encroach under the deck boards, blocking water from flowing out. It’s therefore advisable to regularly clear your drains and floor traps and remove any obstructions at the sub-floor such as tree roots.

Next, though exposure to weather and varying temperatures is inevitable, you can minimise the impact on your decking through a few methods.

Avoid a surface-nailing system so that nails and screws won’t come loose and become a safety hazard. We utilise a side clip fastening system for our deck boards. Stainless steel screws are secured directly to the battens without puncturing the deck’s surface.

You can also regularly treat the surface of your wood flooring with dedicated deck oil, so it’ll repel water and resist mould and UV rays. Such products also help to reduce cracks and colour loss.

 

Steps for maintaining outdoor decking

To avoid the common issues mentioned above, regularly clean and treat your outdoor deck:

  1. Every three to four months, or at least twice a year, scrub your deck with a bristle brush of medium hardness and solution of deck cleaner and water.
  2. Mop the deck dry with a clean cloth and allow it to dry completely.
  3. Apply a thin coat of deck oil, such as Bona Deck Guard, on the wood along the direction of the grain and let it dry. (Check that the deck oil is compatible with the one already applied to the deck.) You can apply a second coat if required.
  4. Finally, leave the deck to dry for at least six hours without any foot traffic. If you’re leaving it to dry overnight, protect it from possible rain with a plastic cover. Pro tip: It’s best to choose a sunny day to do maintenance!

Cleaning your deck and renewing its coating as above, will help ensure that it remains a durable and attractive surface for all your outdoor needs.

If you’re keen to install or upgrade your decking, find out more about our range of heavy-duty hardwood for the outdoors.

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Engineered Timber Provides Luxurious Yet Practical Floors for Singapore’s Tallest Condominium

By Perswood Team,

One of Singapore’s loftiest dwellings, Wallich Residence employs high-grade engineered wood flooring that is classy yet durable.

Known for being the complex where James Dyson once owned a super penthouse, Wallich Residence’s apartments are located on the highest floors (180m to 290m above sea level) of Singapore’s tallest skyscraper, Guoco Tower.

Located in Tanjong Pagar, in the heart of the Central Business District, the 181 homes consist of one- to four-bedroom units, four penthouses and a super penthouse.

As the wood flooring supplier, we installed Oslo Oak and Wenge planks to complement the apartments’ elegant design schemes. Oslo Oak lends its delicate cream colour and evident natural grain as a neutral base to its surroundings. Wenge’s rich dark hues meanwhile furnish the apartments with sophistication and warmth.

Both are hardy woods suitable for residential flooring, rating higher than 1,000 pounds-force (lbf) on the Janka scale.

Engineered timber for sustainability and practicality

Wallich Residence’s emphasis on sustainability has led to it being awarded the Building and Construction Authority’s Green Mark (GoldPlus). In line with its green approach, engineered timber was used for the flooring. Such timber is more sustainable as only its topmost layer (in this case, 4mm-thick) is solid wood. This maximises the solid wood across several lengths of engineered flooring.

We also utilised wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), which ensured it was harvested in an environmentally and socially responsible manner.

We opted for engineered timber partly because of its greater practicality as well. Its composition of multiple slabs of plywood beneath the hardwood surface, results in a more stable structure. This enables it to adjust better to different temperatures and conditions, as compared to solid wood.

When subjected to, for example, dry conditions from air-conditioning, or humidity from Singapore’s tropical climate, engineered timber shrinks and expands less.

 

Premium-grade products

In keeping with Wallich Residence’s ethos of luxurious living, we used premium engineered wood sourced from Italy. This ensured fine craftsmanship, and exquisite attention to detail. For example, the plywood layers were uniformly composed of quality birch timber, and hence long lasting and reliable.

Similarly outfit your apartment with high-grade timber flooring from our Royale range for a classy and luxurious aesthetic. Our engineered flooring solutions guarantee a sustainable yet practical floor that is durable through all weather and temperature conditions.

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How to Choose a Heavy-Duty Wood Floor

By Perswood Team,

Seeking a wood floor that is durable yet pleasing to look at? Find out how to choose a floor that is resistant to dents and damage.

Your floor is an unsung hero as the most-used surface of your home, office or business. After all, you and countless others tread on it day in and day out, move furniture and roll trolleys and toys across it. So, when it comes to choosing a floor, it makes sense that one of the primary considerations be how much wear and tear it can take.

An additional consideration could be pets if you have any, and how well the floor can weather their paws and claws.

Select a wood that accommodates your household’s intensity of use, by keeping the pointers below in mind.

 

Wood that’s suitably hard 

Your floor’s degree of hardness, as measured on the Janka scale, can be one way of determining the hardiness of your floor. The scale, named after Austrian researcher Gabriel Janka, measures the force needed to press a steel ball of 11.28mm diameter into a surface until the ball has sunk in to half its diameter.

In general, wood floorings that are 1,000 pounds-force (lbf) and above on the Janka scale are appropriate for homes. This is especially true for Asian households where shoes are usually taken off, lowering the likelihood of heels or soles indenting the wood. Meanwhile commercial projects, such as restaurants, shopping malls and hotels, work well with wood types that are higher on the scale, around the 2,000 to 3,000 lbf range.

Other factors that homeowners may want to take into consideration include the colour, grain and texture of the wood. Wood types with evident grain and warm neutral tones complement most home decors. Examples of wood floor types that tick all these boxes, and have acceptable hardness, are oak, walnut, birch and teak.

For commercial projects, ipe, Brazilian cherry, wenge and South American timbers are recommended for their harder surfaces to better withstand high foot traffic.

 

Scratches are unavoidable

Though harder wood types can prevent the surface from getting dented, pets can still scratch your floor – regardless of how high it may be on the Janka scale. Tip for pet owners: keep claws trimmed to minimise damage to your flooring!

Nonetheless, wood floors are still a great option for furry friends because of the warmth and comfort they provide.

 

Engineered vs solid wood

Engineered wood has the same degree of hardiness as solid wood, provided that the top-most wood surface is 3mm or more. The advantage of engineered wood is its coating – being UV-cured in the factory means that its coating is more durable and resistant to indentations, compared to the coating done for solid wood onsite.

 

Helping your floor last  

Wood flooring types aside though, the best way to keep your wood floor in tip top shape is to maintain it well. This includes having mats at your doorways to prevent any grit and fine dirt that could scratch the floor from being tracked in, sweeping or vacuuming daily, and mopping with a microfibre mop that is only slightly damp once to twice a week.

Also avoid dragging furniture across the floor, and place protectors under chair legs.

If you want to restore your floor to as pristine a condition as possible, you can lightly sand and recoat your floor every five to six years (a rough guide is when you repaint your home’s walls). The light sanding will remove any residue and contaminants that may have accumulated on its surface from cleaning products, food stains and others. Recoating will then restore its protective layer.

For commercial developments, ensure that a commercial-grade coating is used for the floor. You can top up this coating every year since it’ll see more wear and tear (subject to manufacturer’s recommendation).

 

Conclusion

Though hardness can be a key factor in choosing a suitable wood for your floor, there is a wide range which looks good while lasting through years of use. Regular and careful maintenance will also ensure that your floor endures.

Browse our range of solid and engineered wood, which includes the Janka ratings and descriptions of their characteristics, and chat with us to explore customisation options.

 

 

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